Costs Under $50 Oral Hygiene And Overall Health |

Electric toothbrushes cost about 10 times as much as a manual toothbrushes, and you have to replace the brush heads at the same frequency (every three months), each for about the same cost as a manual brush.
Pro 8000 allows for a 16-degree tooth cleaning and it comes with 6 different cleaning modes to accommodate users with more sensitive teeth and gums. The greatest downside is that the price tag is at around $120.
At the time of writing there are an extensive range of electric toothbrush models available from Sonicare, so it is understandable that it is not all that simple to understand which brush head is suitable for your toothbrush.
The researchers say more work is needed to find out if these two different transcription patterns of inflammatory genes are signs of either two stages of Alzheimer’s, or even two types of the disease.
To brush your teeth, The Goby uses a rotating brush head similar to the Oral-B’s rather than an oscillating head like you’d find on the Philips Sonicare, and it feels like our top pick’s. Though a rotating brush head can produce some vibrations, we’ve found that the Goby is not uncomfortable to use. Goby says its rechargeable, induction-based battery will last two weeks, or 28 cycles, on a single charge. In our testing, a new unit lasted a little longer than that, running for 33 cycles. However, an earlier production model we tested, which may have been defective, lasted only 14 cycles. We prefer the Goby over the weaker Quip subscription brushes, which only vibrate softly like cheaper Oral-B Pulsar disposables.
After hours online trying to follow-up on my dentist’s directive to buy a Sonicare–how hard could that be?–I finally ran across your page. What a relief! You verified much that I’d read but filled in some much needed gaps. I was all set to purchase a 2 Series until I read your info about its vibration levels, and how long a charge lasts in comparison to the HealthyWhite+. Now it’s the HealthyWhite+ for me.
I personally preferred the Sonicare. Perhaps my Oral-B was told tech (likely), but I much preferred the vibrations to the rotating head. Also the batter life was abysmal… currently I go about 2 months on a charge on the Sonicare.
It’s worth noting that with the recent introduction of the DiamondClean Smart, new smart brush heads have been introduced (C3 Premium Plaque Control, G3 Premium Gum Care & W3 Premium White). Whilst they fit and work on other models, the included smart chip that automatically selects the optimal cleaning mode works only with the DiamondClean Smart because it has BrushSync mode pairing. When Sonicare introduces more brushes with this mode, the new brush heads will also work with those models.
I use the Oral-B brushes, and they’re on sale for $4 each every few months from Costco. However, they don’t last anything like 3 months. I haven’t measured, but I’d say they’re about a month each. Maybe 6 weeks.
We could not find any independent studies comparing toothbrush models or brands, and all the ones tested for the fluid dynamics aspect are Sonicare brushes, which are all 31,000 movements-per-minute brushes. Other brands have toothbrushes that move faster, slower, and at roughly the same speed as this. Though the fluid dynamics effect exists, remember that it’s secondary to actual bristles scrubbing your teeth and gums.
If you’re interested in considering a sonic toothbrush that’s not a Sonicare, we’ve noticed the Braun Oral B Pulsonic. Its features list places it in the same general category as the Sonicare models we discuss on this page.
This toothbrush is ideal for anyone, any age, and even for those with sensitivity, with gum recession, or undergoing orthodontic treatment or gum therapy because it gently massages the gums without any pain or bleeding. The colors in your pack of three toothbrushes will vary. This is an Amazon best seller and has nearly 600 five-star reviews on Amazon. It is frequently recommended by dentists, particularly for those with extra-sensitive gums and teeth.
Excessive Pressure Sensor – Pressing too hard while brushing is a real first world problem. This smart indicator senses when there is too much pressure being applied to the teeth and gums, and stalls the toothbrush for a brief moment. Applying too much force while brushing can lead to a variety of gum-related pain and discomfort. This feature is especially important if you are looking for a more sensitive toothbrush for receding gums.
In Australia it is a legal requirement for dental hygienists/ oral health therapist graduates to be registered with the Dental Board of Australia before practising their scope in periodontology in any state or territory in Australia.[19]
Use the right kind of toothbrush and toothpaste. To effectively brush your teeth and ensure that you are getting rid of as much plaque as possible, it is important that you have the right tools. Although there are many fancy toothbrushes on the market, the American Dental Association states that any “soft nylon brush with rounded-end, polished bristles” will do the trick.[1] Hard bristled toothbrushes can be too abrasive and wear away tooth enamel and hurt your gums. Even if you are not using the correct brushing technique, soft bristles will still be better.
The Quip is a no-frills toothbrush with a single brush head style and a simple timer that indicates each 30-second interval, shutting off at the two-minute mark. This is the only brush we tested that uses replaceable batteries instead of a built-in rechargeable battery. Quip has an unusual business model—the only way to get a new brush head is through the company’s website, which encourages a subscription that sends a replacement every three months. Though you can purchase individual brush heads separately for $5 with free shipping, if you need a spare head you can’t just run to the store to get a new one. (And you’d better keep spare or rechargeable AAAs around.) The overall pricing structure is a bit confusing, and the store page defaults to the more expensive metal brushes, but toggling the interface gives you access to the slightly less expensive plastic brushes. Although the stylish design (of the more expensive metal model) and the quiet operation are both impressive, we found the vibrations to be weak. The Quip could be a nice option for someone who travels a lot and prefers the freedom of no charger, but it doesn’t have the brush head options or wide availability of our main pick.
Counter oscillating – Is the last type of electric cleaning motion that toothbrushes come equipped with. The idea of this design is to allow each tuft of bristles to rotate in the opposite way of its neighbor. For instance, while one tuft may be rotating clockwise, its neighboring tufts could be going in a counter-clockwise direction.

Offering the deepest clean, the Sonicare electric toothbrush is not as effective without such an engineered brush head.  Taking full advantage of the high-frequency and high-amplitude brush movements, performing over 31,000 strokes per minute, the brush head takes that power and drives toothpaste and fluid deep in between teeth.
When it comes to chewing ice, many might think it will do no harm since ice is made from water. However, chewing on solid objects such as ice can have catastrophic consequences for your teeth. Chipping may occur and this can lead to more tooth fractures in the future. Chewing on ice has been linked to symptoms of anemia. People with anemia tend to want to eat food with no nutritional value.[42][43]
Both Dr. McConnell and Casper say that sonic toothbrushes tend to work better because they’re similar to the microsonic scaler equipment used in a professional clinic. Microsonic scaler technology removes both the biofilm (goo) and calculus (hard deposits) on teeth.
Thanks. That’s a good tip but I’m talking about 3 to 4 years (the normal lifespan of the battery, not a faulty one) and and the mechanism is good for way more than that. That makes it unnecessarily disposable and therefore an environmental bad.
Thank you for adding the link about the waterpik toothbrush, above. I bought the Waterpik about two years ago because there was a 50% discount at the store… I really like it, and it is quieter than the the Sonicare I use for travelling. I do not use the Waterpik for travelling, because you need to pack the whole unit (waterpik, toothbrush, and holding container) which takes up a lot of space. Additionally, once the battery goes, you need to replace the whole unit if you want the toothbrush back—you cannot buy one separately—or you buy an independent sonic toothbrush anyway (or break into the unit and solder in new batteries, like I did…) Also, you may have difficulty finding the brush heads; I live in Canada and must order them through a US post-box, even though the units are sold in Canada! Would I do this again, I would buy an independent sonic toothbrush that has all parts available locally, and a compact waterpik unit. That said, my dentist thinks my teeth & gums are the best they have ever been.
This article approached the topic exactly as I would have and was so helpful! I had started to get confused about the subtle differences between models I was considering; your summary and all the related info was just the ticket. Thanks for taking the time to create it–a very valuable service.
Sterilized.. maybe but I hate to have to tell you it’s probably not clean in the sense most people are thinking. Soap leaves a residue that may or may not be harmful. Of course this depends on the soap your using.
Jump up ^ Van Leeuwen M, Slot D, Van der Weijden G. “Essential oils compared to chlorhexidine with respect to plaque and parameters of gingival inflammation: a systematic review.” Journal of Periodontology. 2011;82(2):174–194.
We’d also suggest that 6 months out or so, even those people who originally enjoyed the novelty (yes, just novelty) of having more than one brushing mode to choose from have long since forgotten that these options exist, and likely even how to activate them.
Hydrogen peroxide can be used to clean your bathroom counters, used as a mouthwash, and even used to disinfect your toothbrush. Just soak toothbrush bristles in hydrogen peroxide for several minutes, then rinse thoroughly with hot water. (thanks Becca and Tara!)
Apps: Bluetooth connectivity and compatible phone apps that track your brushing habits are becoming increasingly popular with high-end models. It’s a neat feature, but a basic two-minute timer also encourages better technique and speaking with your dentist is really the best way to get updates on your dental health. The one exception is with kids’ brushes — apps can be helpful for encouraging children to brush. In fact, some brushing apps were so fun that children wouldn’t stop playing (manufacturers had to update their apps to make the game unplayable between brushes).
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Product – Sonimart Compact Size Replacement Toothbrush Heads for Philips Sonicare ProResults HX6024, 4 pack, fits Essence+, Plaque Control, Gum Health, DiamondClean, FlexCare, HealthyWhite and EasyClean

5 Replies to “Costs Under $50 Oral Hygiene And Overall Health |”

  1. Use a mouthwash that targets plaque. Though plaque-busting mouthwashes are not effective enough to remove plaque all by themselves, when used as part of a teeth cleaning routine involving brushing and flossing, they can help to loosen plaque, while giving you minty-fresh breath in the process.
    I have an ancient and long-ago discontinued Oral B Sonic Care Complete brush that I refuse to give up. I have duct tape on the band and have to pay a fortune for the proprietary brush heads on Amazon but honestly, no matter what other Oral B brush I buy, nothing compares to the old tried and true. So many new ones make my head vibrate from the inside out or the brush heads are wrong shape for my mouth. I really hate when any company discontinues a good thing.
    Fading reminder bristles are present to help you recognise when it is time to change the head (recommendation of every 3 months).  But better still, if using a Smart Sonicare brush handle the brush will monitor how often the head is used and how hard you brush and remind you at precisely the right time to change.
    Agreed. I did successfully replace the batteries in both of my Oral-B brushes, but it took some de-soldering, cutting, and re-soldering to get the job done. In the end, I was able to use larger capacity batteries, but it was a lot of work. Unless you are handy and/or work with electronics, I don’t recommend it.
    Thanks for your very helpful articles on the Sonicare models. They were really useful for cutting through the fat so to speak. I ended up purchasing the series 3 gum health. Unfortunately I didn’t realize that the user can’t disable smart timer or quadpacer on this model if desired (others with mode button can disable quad pacer). I also didn’t realize that the toothbrush shuts off after two minutes (smarttimer). Not sure if i just missed out on this, or if it needs to be added. Not a huge problem; i may actually need these timers to brush properly for at least two minutes.

  2. Product – Sonimart Standard Size Replacement Toothbrush Heads for Philips Sonicare ProResults HX6014, 4 pack, fits Essence+, Plaque Control, Gum Health, DiamondClean, FlexCare, HealthyWhite and EasyClean
    Using the Sonicare DimaondClean Smart with the C3 Premium Plaque Control, G3 Premium Gum Care & W3 Premium White brush head? If so, thanks to a special chip built into the head, a brush head reminder icon will light up on your brush handle when it is time to change.
    Soniccare are junk and the company does not stand behind their product. I had one with a defective battery and it started to smell bad. The only thing I got from their customer service is 15% off to purchase another one with free shipping. Why would I purchase another product from your company when you don’t stand behind the product I bought? Go with Oral B.
    That difference was especially true for the compatible apps — the Sonicare app was much more intuitive and the real-time feedback was better. For instance, the Sonicare app displays a 3D model of your teeth and the toothbrush will recognize whether you are angling your brush properly. If brushing properly, the teeth on the display will progressively get whiter. However, if you use poor technique the teeth on the display won’t change, and if you use too much movement or pressure, an alert will display on your phone. The Oral-B app isn’t bad, but our tester reported navigating the menus was more difficult. In addition, the position detection for brushing angle was less accurate than the Sonicare’s app — our tester eventually found themselves flailing the Oral-B 8000 around to find the right position. While apps and brushing modes aren’t essential, they will make a toothbrush expensive. If we are paying extra for features, we want them to be easy to use, and for that reason the DiamondClean takes the crown.
    Dental hygienists in Canada must have completed a diploma program, this can be 19 months to 3 years. All dental hygiene students must pass a NDHCB (NDHCB) examination after graduation. This examination is offered three times per year, January, May and September. Three universities in Canada offer Bachelor of Science degrees in Dental Hygiene: Dalhousie University, University of Alberta, University of British Columbia.[3][4][5]
    Prior to this, dental hygienists were first domestically trained in 1974 for use in the New Zealand Defence Force. The one-year course was taught by the Royal New Zealand Dental Corp at the Burnham army base outside Christchurch.[12] Hygiene training was briefly offered at the Wellington School for Dental Nurses in 1990 as 2 week a supplement to Dental Therapy students training.[12] However, this was quickly discontinued.[12]
    The flexibility of the string allows to wrap it up around the tooth and scrape off stubborn plaque residue. Traditional floss is also very cost effective when compared to electric toothbrushes and their inevitable need for replacement parts.
    This is the redesigned successor of the above mentioned Essence model. There are some visible improvements, but there are also some gray areas. This newer model costs on average 50% or so more than the older one.
    Students interested in becoming dental hygienists have two primary degree options. A 2-year degree is the most common degree pursued by aspiring dental hygienists, but bachelor’s degree programs are available as well. Students can expect to learn about proper oral hygiene, cleaning techniques, and conditions like gum disease. At both levels of study, students will participate in field experiences at local dental clinics or offices. Some schools offer programs or courses online.
    If you’re ready to purchase one of our five finalists, check out the matrix above. But if you’d like to learn more about not just our top picks, but electric toothbrushes and oral hygiene in general, read on. Up ahead: clean, healthy teeth. Your mouth is going to thank you.

  3. One thing worth pointing out about electric toothbrushes is that they are not cheaper in the long run. Electric toothbrushes cost about 10 times as much as manual toothbrushes, and you have to replace the brush heads at the same frequency (every three months), each for about the same cost as a manual brush. What you get for the higher cost is less friction in achieving good brushing habits, and, according to research, a significant reduction in plaque and gingivitis, even if that reduction may come only from having a brush that encourages good habits, like a full two minutes of brushing for each session.
    The Oral-B Pro 3000 3D White Smart Series is another smart brush. The least expensive of all Bluetooth models we’ve considered, this brush is part of the Oral-B line of electric toothbrushes that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance. It is similar to our top pick in form and function, except it has three cleaning modes (two more than necessary), and connects to an app via Bluetooth. It’s also twice the price. Though this model does not offer position detection, it stores brushing time and pressure data from the 30 most recent brushing sessions, which you can sync to the app later, should you prefer not to bring your phone or tablet into the bathroom every time you clean your mouth. If you find reviewing your basic brushing performance motivational, and would rather not need an app or pen and paper handy each time you brush, consider the Pro 3000 Smart Series.
    The Colgate Smart Electronic Toothbrush E1 uses on-board sensors and “artificial intelligence” to track the brush head’s location as you move it around your mouth. (For more on our experience with the smart capabilities of the E1, see “Oral-B Genius Pro 8000 Review: Who Needs a Smart Toothbrush?”) The E1 vibrates but does not oscillate, and does so more quietly than most electric toothbrushes we’ve tested. Although it does have an on-board two-minute timer with quadrant pacing, this device lacks a pressure sensor (a possible dealbreaker for some), and it is compatible with only a single style of replacement brush heads, which can be purchased only from the Colgate website. Factoring in shipping costs, these replacement heads are among the most expensive we’ve considered, by far (a definite dealbreaker, in our opinion). The handle itself is among the lightest and most streamlined we’ve tested, featuring a single on-off button (Colgate doesn’t offer superfluous cleaning modes). As with other smart toothbrushes, we believe the E1 is overkill for most. However, if you’re interested in accurate brush head position detection along with automated habit-tracking, and would prefer not to grant another app access to your phone’s camera and/or microphone, the E1 performs well in these respects (and—replacement brush heads excluded—generally costs less than its closest competitors, the Oral-B Genius 8000 and the Philips Sonicare FlexCare Platinum Connected).
    Alzheimer’s: Protein from outside the brain may be involved A new study in mice finds that amyloid beta from outside the brain can cause brain plaques, neuron damage, and other hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease. Read now

  4. The Goby Electric Toothbrush is only a few dollars more than our other picks and comes with the same no-frills features: a two-minute timer that shuts the brush off at the end, plus a quadrant timer to prompt you to switch areas every 30 seconds. Goby offers an “optional” brush head subscription service—however, keep in mind that you can’t get new brush heads anywhere else and there is only one kind available. Unlike the Sonicare, there is no travel case to stash your brush head.
    Please note: During the most recent update of our Oral-B pages (11/5/2015), we noticed that the Pulsonic was no longer listed with other current products on the Oral-B (USA) website. For that reason, we must assume that it has been discontinued.
    After hours online trying to follow-up on my dentist’s directive to buy a Sonicare–how hard could that be?–I finally ran across your page. What a relief! You verified much that I’d read but filled in some much needed gaps. I was all set to purchase a 2 Series until I read your info about its vibration levels, and how long a charge lasts in comparison to the HealthyWhite+. Now it’s the HealthyWhite+ for me.
    With the Sonicare line, buying a higher priced toothbrush doesn’t equate with getting a different brushing action. But there are some design and performance differences that may make a noticeable difference in your overall brushing experience.
    “1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Resolvin D1 Retune the Balance between Amyloid-β Phagocytosis and Inflammation in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients”;Mathew T. Mizwicki, Guanghao Liu, Milan Fiala, Larry Magpantay, James Sayre, Avi Siani, Michelle Mahanian, Rachel Weitzman, Eric Hayden, Mark J. Rosenthal, Ilka Nemere, John Ringman and David B. Teplow; Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, Feb 2013; DOI: 10.3233/JAD-121735; Link to Pre-Press Abstract (27 Nov 2012).
    The Braun 1000 (and Canadian 2000 model) oscillate 8800 times per minute and pulsate 20,000 times per minute. The 3000, 4000, and 5000 models oscillate at the same rate but pulsate at 40,000 per minute. There are some that say that the 40,000 pulsations act similar to Sonicare’s 31,000 micro-vibrating sweeps, that clean beyond where the toothbrush comes in contact with your teeth…by spraying water, toothpaste and saliva between teeth etc. The 20,000 pulsations are theoretically less effective than the 40,000 pulsations in this respect.
    We have to assume that these numbers represent the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP). But on more than one occasion we found online retailers displaying a higher “listed” price (which makes their “discounted” price look better).
    We tested this particular model by switching between the five available modes. It is likely that the battery could last a bit longer if you only use the daily clean mode. Other available modes include gum care, sensitive, whitening, and pro-clean.

  5. Sherry, that’s a very good point. I live in Switzerland and it’s GMO free so I don’t have to worry about that, thankfully, but I need to remember that many readers are in the US and should use organic as much as possible. Thanks for the reminder 🙂
    FWIW, I bought an Oral-B ProfessionalCare 1000 based on the recommendation here, after I lost my 4000. The 4000 cleaned my teeth much more thoroughly–I can often feel some guck on my teeth after using the 1000, which never happened with the 4000. The 4000 “pulsates” at 40,000 pulsations/minute, compared with teh 20,000 for the 1000. YMMV, but the 4000 works a lot better for me.
    I highly don’t recommend leaving acids on teeth, however, Vitamin C on the teeth (and in general) can do wonders so you can use the sodium ascorbate form of vitamin C on your teeth. When making a glass of a gram or two with water, I sometimes swish it all around for a minute or so, a few separate times, before swallowing.
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises against using your dishwasher or microwave to disinfect toothbrushes. The CDC even includes ultraviolet devices on the list of things that may damage the toothbrush.
    Clean your toothbrush holder once a week. Bacteria that accumulates on the toothbrush holder can be transmitted to the brush, and then to your mouth. It is particularly important to clean your holder regularly if it has a closed bottom, like a cup.[6]

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