Healthy Oral Hygiene And General Health

Our research showed that the majority of toothbrushes approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as ultrasonic, generate around 196,000,000 movements per minute. This means that they function at around 1.6 Mhz. Unlike oscillating or sonic models, this type uses powerful ultrasound waves to clean below the gum line.
Keep your toothbrush away from the toilet. Most people will often place their brushes by the toilet. It has been found that some bacteria become airborne during flushing. You don’t want that on your brush!
This is some of the worst advice I have ever seen! Just curious…..do you have a degree in dentistry?? Using baking soda on a regular basis is very abrasive on the teeth which in turn can cause erosion to the enamel and sensitivity. Rubbing citrus fruits on teeth? Are you kidding me? The acid from the citrus can cause erosion on the teeth, which in turn causes sensitivity, in some cases sensitivity bad enough to the point that restorative dentistry needs to be done. We see it all the time with people that suck on lemons! And suggesting using a “dental pic” as you call it…it’s called a scaler; should NEVER be done by anyone other than a hygienist or dentist. You can cause damage to the gum tissue if you don’t know what you’re doing. Stupid advice! All of it is nonsense! Don’t do any of these things! Get the tarter/calculus removed by a professional!
Keeping the Aura Clean Toothbrush in first class condition takes place within the Aura Clean Base Station. Inside is a ring of UV-C light that attacks pathogens from all angles. The Aura Clean Base Station keeps the brush head protected, clean and away from environmental contaminants and also dries the brush head while charging – allowing the brush ready for use when you are.
Remember to brush your tongue. Plaque can easily build up on the surface of the tongue due to food residues, so make sure to give it a little gentle scrub too. This will also help to freshen your breath.
Brush your teeth twice daily. Brushing your teeth is by far the most effective way of removing plaque, and brushing properly and regularly will help to ensure that less plaque builds up over time. This is important as built-up plaque can calcify into tartar, which is a lot harder to remove. You should brush your teeth once a day at the very least, but dentists recommend brushing twice; once in the morning and once before bed.[3]
Soniccare are junk and the company does not stand behind their product. I had one with a defective battery and it started to smell bad. The only thing I got from their customer service is 15% off to purchase another one with free shipping. Why would I purchase another product from your company when you don’t stand behind the product I bought? Go with Oral B.
They only have one sonic toothbrush, which is a sonic model, and which you can get for less than $45. What we loved about it, is that it is priced as an entry level toothbrush, but it comes with features and options that bigger brands will not offer for less than $80.
Back in March 2010, Consumer Reports performed its own tests for plaque removal and concluded, “[T]he two priciest brushes removed 75 percent or more of plaque in our tests, on average.” In the years following those tests, two of the top models have been discontinued and replaced by similar ones, and one has been recalled; as of May 2016, CR no longer tests toothbrushes at all. GHI’s recommendations don’t say much and do not explain whether expensive features are really necessary.
Several weeks ago the base unit’s UV light ceased working. While the base unit was still charging the handle just fine, it was no longer cleaning it. I received a new replacement only after sending my existing unit back. I would have liked to have continued using the original unit while I waited for the new one to arrive, but that was a minor inconvenience.
Dental hygienist instructors train new dental hygienists at academic institutions such as community colleges and universities. They instruct students in classrooms and laboratory settings in methods to remove tartar and stains, take and process x-rays, apply sealants and fluorides, as well as proper oral care and tracking treatment plans and patient care. These instructors must be able to work with a wide variety of students from diverse backgrounds, responding to their questions and ensuring they are learning course materials. Dental hygiene instructors must also maintain good student records, as well as stay up to date on developments within their field.
The Easy Clean and Sonicare 2 were introduced as “middle” range models, they were never “top” ones. The Essence above is Sonicare’s older design (although a “top” model in its day) and we’d expect it to be the noisiest of all those listed on this page.
Sonic toothbrushes have longer heads that resemble traditional toothbrushes and vibrate up to 40,000 strokes per minute. Dr. Glassman told us they also incorporate “fluid dynamics which is a secondary cleaning action that extends the brush’s reach.” Translation? A sonic toothbrush’s scrubbing can reach farther than its oscillating counterpart’s (even if it does tickle a bit on the way).
Chew sesame seeds. Chew a spoonful of sesame seeds, but do not swallow. Then use a dry toothbrush to brush your teeth, using the sesame seeds as a kind of toothpaste. They will help to remove plaque and polish your teeth at the same time.[6]
Charging voltage – We have considered sonic models that can run on 110 – 220 volt electrical systems. This feature is very convenient for people who travel around the world. It is also a simple technology that we believe should be easily implemented in all rechargeable sonic toothbrushes. So, if you don’t have it, you didn’t make Dental Dork’s awesome list.
Subscription toothbrushes: The main draw of a subscription toothbrush is convenience. Rather than having to buy a new replacement head every 3 months — the recommended lifespan of a toothbrush head — a subscription service will simply send you one. We held our subscription toothbrushes to the same quality standards as our other adult toothbrushes. But given that they are subscription toothbrushes, we also compared the terms of service to see whether one was more worthwhile or cost effective than the other.
High strokes per minute: Electric toothbrushes can move as rapidly as 40,000 strokes per minute. While higher stroke numbers can make an electric toothbrush more effective than a manual brush, Dr. Friedman explained “at some point, extra brushstrokes aren’t really adding any benefits. [Around] 8,000 brushstrokes is enough to achieve the maximum level of plaque removal.” In simple terms, higher numbers look nice, but moving from 8,000 (oscillating) to 31,000 or 40,000 (sonic) brushstrokes won’t really have an effect on your teeth and gums.
We’ve been using an electric toothbrush for years, and like the way they work and how thorough they clean our teeth. The only negative is that the replacement brushes are ridiculously expensive. I tried a generic brand, but they didn’t last very long. Additionally, I’ve never thought about those germs collecting on the brush as it sat exposed in our bathroom, so this idea from TAO perked my interest. It uses Ultraviolet-C rays to kill almost all the germs that accumulate.
Our view is that these apps are fun, but for a short period of time. After a while, they become repetitive and monotone. So, if a person’s attachment to tooth brushing is associated with the app, it will quickly disappear. Therefore, not creating long-term discipline.
There are several commercially available toothbrush sanitizers on the market. Although data do not demonstrate that they provide a specific health benefit, if a consumer chooses to use one of these devices, the Council recommends that they select a product cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Products cleared by the FDA are required to provide data to the Agency to substantiate cleared claims. Examples of claims that have been cleared by the FDA for these products include:
Until now, I have been dental flossing, then using a dental irrigator to clean the gum line, then wiped the surface of my teeth with a soft cotton cloth. This really kept my teeth clean, but I am new to your website – maybe it wasn’t good for my teeth. I don’t know…
This was one of the most effective and entertaining brushes that we tested. Made out of white molded plastic, the Sonicare FlexCare Platinum was among the lightest brushes that we tested. The metallic control panel gives this model a very modern and sophisticated feel.
We’d like to think that the information we present on this page does a fairly decent job of pointing out both brush strengths and deficiencies, and in a manner that helps the reader to then make a decision about what level of brush seems to best serve their needs.
“I cannot recommend this toothbrush enough. I have sensitive gums, so the three intensity levels are a nice feature. It also does an excellent job of plaque removal. You’ll still need to floss, but there won’t be much left at all, as seen by using plaque-disclosing tabs. The most noticeable difference is the whitening effect, too. I dipped for 11 years, and it had taken a toll on my teeth. This brush has definitely made a difference in that department. I’ll see if I can get dentist pics and update this later, but it’s really been huge. The design of the brush allows it to stay much cleaner than a lot of other electric brushes I’ve had in the past, too, which is nice. No nasty surprises when replacing heads, and it comes with a nice travel case as well. Highly recommended.”
Is awesome. Thank g-d for your website. It’s gorgeous with clear, concise, accurate information. A consumer’s dream. I did about 3 days worth of research on electric toothbrushes before I found your site, and I saw that your research and findings matched mine exactly. I cannot find a better reason to trust your information. Thank you so very much. Wow.
They obviously took a step back in the 2 Series to have a stylish entry level product at a very attractive price. Many will still be happy with it considering the price and comparing it to a manual toothbrush. I also notice the 2 Series ships with the Plaque Control head. This head is small. I had noticed when I moved to the slightly larger DiamondClean head, the 2 Series felt even more underpowered. Therefore, if someone is going to use the 2 Series, I recommend sticking with the Plaque Control head, it makes the most out of the lower power 2 Series.
“Average folks brush 46 seconds. With timers people will go to at least the two minutes,” said Dr. Joan Gluch, an adjunct associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania Dental School. “Clinically, we see patients do better with powered toothbrushes.” Dr. Mark Wolff, a professor at NYU Dental School and chair of the Cariology and Comprehensive Care department, agreed: “It helps people that don’t brush well,” he said. “If you need the guidance, invest in the guidance.”
You know that super clean feeling your mouth has after a visit to the dentist? It’s because they’re able to thoroughly clean your teeth in ways that your manual toothbrush just can’t. Enter the TAO Clean Aura Clean Sonic Toothbrush and Cleaning Station. Using state-of-the-art sonic technology and 40,000 tiny brush strokes per minute, the TAO Clean Aura Clean Sonic Toothbrush and Cleaning Station safely and hygienically cleans your mouth by dislodging debris from your teeth and gums, and efficiently polishing your teeth. Not only that, but because it automatically shuts off after (dentist-recommended) 2 minutes of brushing, your pearly whites are actually getting 80,000 total brush strokes every time you brush your teeth! Do you think you could do 80,000 brush strokes in 2 minutes?
not true for all areas. I live in a small town with lots of dental offices. the office I work at now we have hygienists working part time (24hr/week) and making $78,000/year. plus they get vacation time sick time holiday pay and yearly bonuses.
!! This is an important point because despite what type your brush came with originally, you can switch to any other (style or size) head. That makes for a lot of options. (More information about brush heads.)

Doing regular cardiovascular exercises that are moderately paced like jogging, brisk walking, treadmill, riding a bike, dancing and aerobics can help to melt away arterial plaque build-up. Doing this on a regular basis can improve circulation, lower “bad” cholesterol and raise “good cholesterol.” Try to exercise for 30 to 60 minutes weekly and increase the amount each week to help burn calories and fat.
Sterline also offers the widely marketed UV clean technology that is supposed to kill 99.9% of bacteria on brush heads. Arguably, once the brush heads are stored inside the case, the UV lights are activated and leftover germs are eliminated. This is something that we are not completely sold on. It has nothing to do with the brand, but with the technology itself. There is very little academic research to support these claims, and frankly, we could not find any that is reliably associated with well-known faculties.
This range of brush heads includes: DiamondClean (standard & compact sizes), Adaptive Clean (standard & compact sizes), Intercare (standard), ProResults (standard & compact sizes), ProResults Plaque Control (standard), ProResults Gum Health (standard), Sensitive (standard), Simply Clean (standard & compact sizes) and For Kids (standard & compact sizes), C3 Premium Plaque Control (standard), G3 Premium Gum Care (standard), W3 Premium White (standard).
The compact design also makes for a more comparable offering to Oral-B’s brush head design that typically is smaller than that of Philips Sonicare brushes.  The technology and motion is still slightly different in how each head moves and cleans the tooth surface, but both still do an excellent job.

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