High Price Sonicare Adaptive Clean Toothbrush Heads

Since our mouths contain bacteria and the bathroom does as well, it’s common to wonder if your toothbrush stays clean enough with just a rinse after brushing, especially since some products now claim to sanitize. Toothbrush sanitizing, however, is not the same as sterilizing. Sanitation means 99.9 percent of bacteria are reduced. With sterilization, all living organisms are destroyed.
We love the Sonicare For Kids Sonic Electric Toothbrush electric toothbrush for taking the fuss out of brushing sessions. With bright colors, stickers, and a compatible phone app, it helps kids stay engaged while they brush. It even managed to make our young tester excited to brush again the next morning. A one-minute timer that gradually increases to two minutes will help your young ones get used to longer brushing periods, and we appreciate that the interactive features mean the brush teaches, rather than forces, better brushing habits. Kids will eventually outgrow it, but for $40 you can lay the groundwork for a future of healthy smiles.

The field of dental hygiene is growing rapidly. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of dental hygienists is expected to increase by 38 percent between 2010 and 2020 – considerably faster than average.1 Plus, dental hygienists will always be in demand because people will always need their teeth to be cleaned!
The tasks hygienists may perform, and the extent to which they must be supervised by a dentist, vary by state and by the setting in which the dental hygienist works. For example, some states allow hygienists to diagnose certain health problems independently of a dentist.
Plaque is a biofilm composed of bacteria. It’s literally an enormous mass of tiny bacteria. The individual organisms are microscopic, but when enough of them aggregate together, you get a slimy substance. Plaque formation is a normal, natural process. Soon after you brush, you’ve already started accumulating a “pellicle,” a saliva layer consisting of glycoproteins. This protein layer actually protects your teeth from bacterial acids. However, the glycoproteins also allow bacteria to adhere to the pellicle, leading to plaque formation.
I wanted something with a pressure sensor. I like to lift heavy things at the gym and have a tendency to strong arm everything, including brushing my teeth which apparently may have contributed to some gum erosion. The current top model Sonicare (DiamondClean Platinum) does not have a pressure sensor. However, the FlexCare Platinum Connected does come with a pressure sensor. Oral-B models from the 1000 up have a pressure sensor. Based on price, I elected to compare the Sonicare FlexCare Platinum Connected to the current top model Oral-B, Genius Pro 8000.
Like we discussed above, plaque (especially mature plaque) definitely can provide a fortress for the ‘bad bugs’ to increase their populations (bad news).  A recent article titled, Understanding the root cause of tooth decay and gum disease, explains how the microbes in an environment are the heavy hitters that ‘control the playing field’.  When plaque matures, the types of microbes shift from a healthy balance of microbes to an environment dominated and controlled by ‘bad bugs’.
Avoid brushing with pressure when you use baking soda as toothpaste. Also, do not use baking soda for more than five days in a row because it is abrasive and may damage your tooth enamel if you use it too often.
This brush head simply clicks on and off your brush handle for a secure fit and easy maintenance and cleaning and is compatible with all Sonicare brushes with the exception of PowerUp Battery and Essence models.
The “ad hominem attack” is yours, claiming I said “it feels cleaner to me” when I said no such thing. My checkups are better, as suspected from the way my teeth feel, but I don’t use “it feels cleaner to me” as evidence.
As examples, people seem to complain that this brush’s mechanism is noisy and less refined than the higher-end models. And some commenters on this page have complain that they consider this brush under powered (they don’t get the same “clean” as with more expensive Sonicares).
Careful, sustained brushing. Wait half an hour after each meal, then brush your teeth. This removes plaque and prevents tartar from forming. If you brush as long as three minutes, using the right technique, you should be able to remove all of the plaque.
The very expensive Oral-B SmartSeries Black 7000 comes with a “digital guide,” another (unnecessary) abstraction of a timer, and six brushing modes programmed to a separate power button. The base is very heavy, with large rubber panels in black and silver plastic, and weighted toward the bottom, with the same light-up pressure sensor as the 4000 model. The 7000 comes with a travel case and a charging stand that can hold four extra brush heads encased in a little plastic dome.
Unfortunately, our website doesn’t have the resources of a big organization (like Consumer Reports for example) who might run dozens of each model for weeks on end to evaluate reliability. Or scientifically measure how the brushing action of one compares to another. So, actually quantifying model differences isn’t really something we can do.
At Dental Dorks we stand strongly behind our choice of the Sonicare 2 Series. It has an elegant minimalist design and it comes equipped with all necessary features, such as the two-minute timer. In addition, it is very gentle on the gum line and teeth, while completely obliterating plaque and food debris with its sonic speed. Being a part of the Sonicare family, it comes with 31,000 brush strokes per minute, which is more than enough to achieve a better oral hygiene right off the bat!
I much prefer the smaller circular heads as they are much easier to maneuver around your mouth and especially for spot scrubbing and getting behind the very back molars which is always a problem for me.
There are many manufacturers and hundreds of different models of electric toothbrushes available on the market. In order to pick the best seven, we had to come up with an inclusive as well as exclusive criteria and stick to it. Having said that, there are two key factors that we considered before we even begun to rank the toothbrushes.
I bought Wirecutter’s Oral-B recommendation for a replacement about 9 months ago. I quickly found I couldn’t handle the small round brush head that came with it – it was unpleasant. I need a compact brush head so I purchased the DeepSweep brush head. It was a little big for my preferences but still a better option than the original brush head. That was more $$ on top of the Oral-B price, though still an overall good price. As I traveled with the Oral-B, I became increasingly annoyed by the lack of a sanitary cover accessory. Another difference is my Oral-B base stayed clean (as did my second Sonicare) but the Oral-B charger collected an unbelieveable amount of whitish gunk after just a week or so. Maybe it wouldn’t happen if I was using the small round brush head but my Sonicares did not collect gunk to this extent (some but not as much as Oral-B). So that is another turn off.
The crux of this issue is that the Sonicare has no clinical evidence to show that it’s better at cleaning than a normal brush whereas the Oral-B does. Lots of it. You can click the links and read the papers for yourself.
Thanks for your very helpful articles on the Sonicare models. They were really useful for cutting through the fat so to speak. I ended up purchasing the series 3 gum health. Unfortunately I didn’t realize that the user can’t disable smart timer or quadpacer on this model if desired (others with mode button can disable quad pacer). I also didn’t realize that the toothbrush shuts off after two minutes (smarttimer). Not sure if i just missed out on this, or if it needs to be added. Not a huge problem; i may actually need these timers to brush properly for at least two minutes.
When it comes to the type of handle (such as non-slip grip or flexible neck), shape of the head (tapered or rectangular) and style of bristles (such as rippled, flat or trimmed to a dome shape), pick whatever is most comfortable for you. The best toothbrush is one that fits your mouth and allows you to reach all teeth easily
Since 2006,[12] New Zealand dental hygienists are trained at either University of Otago in Dunedin (at the country’s only Dental School) or at Auckland University of Technology.[24] The qualifications (Bachelor of Oral Health at Otago, Bachelor of Health Science in Oral Health at AUT) enable graduates to register and practise as both a dental hygienist and a dental therapist.[12]
Fortunately, due to the aforementioned large range of brush heads, you can buy another type that feels better if you do not like the Pro 1000. Toothbrushes are meant to be replaced every three months anyway, so buying new brush heads is an inevitability; you just have to eat the cost of the two Pro heads that come with the brush.
Some of the downfalls to practicing in different provinces are the different regulations. For instance, in BC, the hygienist cannot provide treatment without the patient receiving a dental exam in the previous 365 days unless the practicing hygienist has an extended duty module (resident-care module). In AB, BC, MB and SK, hygienists also administer local anesthesia if qualified to do so.[6][7][8][9] In Ontario, dental hygienists may take further training to become a restorative dental hygienist. Registered dental hygienists must register every year by December 31. Ontario dental hygienists must also prove continuing competence by maintaining a professional portfolio yearly. In Ontario, dental hygienists are registered with the College of Dental Hygienists of Ontario (CDHO). [23]
Oscillating toothbrushes have round heads that rotate back and forth and average 7,500-8,000 strokes per minute. They are less likely to cause the characteristic “teeth-tickling” sensation of sonic models, but are generally louder and can cause discomfort for those with sensitive gums.
These brushes give the impression of having a superior design and build. However while we do believe this is point is accurate, actually quantifying this difference in comparison to other models is difficult. (That’s why we’ve sought out sources involving user/owner input when formulating this page.)
Sonicare Toothbrush Replacement Heads Electric Toothbrush Heads w/ Cap by ITERY for Philips Sonicare Proresults Diamondclean Flexcare Healthy White Plaque Control Gum Health Sonicare 3 series – 4 Pack
When it comes to functionality and features, this is by far not the most advanced product. With 11,000 high-intensity pulsations per minute, it falls short to compete with Philips and Oral-B. Instead, the Issa model is a daring attempt by Foreo to give the standard motor-powered toothbrush a face-lift.
A few years ago this was one of Sonicare’s newest options. At this point in time it only comes on one of the FlexCare Platinum Connected models (HX9192/02). And while this is one of Sonicare’s higher-end toothbrushes, this feature hasn’t been carried over into the newer DiamondClean and DiamondClean Smart product lines.
We applied the same buying model to the Sonicare line and tried not to buy brushes that were differentiated only by their unnecessary features. We also bought one high-end brush, the DiamondClean, to assess if the cleaning experience was $120 better. It was not.
Just a quick note to say how happy I am with your products. I first heard of them on a blog and was so inspired by the raving review that I decided to try them myself. And glad I am I did, they are so good I cannot imagine brushing with toothpaste ever again, love the fresh and clean feeling I get from just TWO drops of your HealThy Mouth Blend.
This is what happened to me as well, sounded great at first but then all of these people are saying that they regret their choice of becoming a Dh. But then again, I’m sure every occupation will have the same type of opinions about it.
Is there a relationship between “sensitive” mode on some brushes and low or medium “intensity” on Series 3. Fewer strokes/min? Also, please confirm that only “clean” mode, i.e. full bore 31,000 strokes /min, accomplishes the “fluid dynamic” cleaning – or does sensitive &/or med/low intensity just have less?? My concern centers around abrasive notching of the root surface. Does any particular brush head facilitate fluid dynamic cleaning? Intercare? Thanks
Designed to reach deep between teeth and into hard to reach areas the InterClean brush heads feature extra-long, high-density bristles to target hidden plaque caught deep between teeth and in other hard-to-clean areas.
We’ve been using an electric toothbrush for years, and like the way they work and how thorough they clean our teeth. The only negative is that the replacement brushes are ridiculously expensive. I tried a generic brand, but they didn’t last very long. Additionally, I’ve never thought about those germs collecting on the brush as it sat exposed in our bathroom, so this idea from TAO perked my interest. It uses Ultraviolet-C rays to kill almost all the germs that accumulate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *