Learn Oral Hygiene Centre |

To begin the search, we trawled the manufacturer websites of the highest-rated brands and looked at the recommendations of Consumer Reports and the Good Housekeeping Institute for toothbrush models as well as their replacement or substitution toothbrush heads, an important factor in choosing a best toothbrush.
We’ve tested electric toothbrushes since 2014, focusing on user experience, handle comfort and battery life. Based on the results of our most recent tests, we believe the Philips Sonicare FlexCare Platinum is the best electric toothbrush for most people. It’s comfortable to hold and lightweight, and it left our testers’ teeth with a satisfied, clean feeling. It also comes with a travel charger and case as well as an additional brush head. The model we tested includes a UV sanitizer for the brush heads, and while there’s little hard data on the efficacy of these sanitizers, they provide some peace of mind.
We’ll also state that today when looking at the overall “star ratings” on Amazon for the Sonicare Series 2 and 3 as compared to the higher-priced models, the 2 and 3 (each having hundreds, if not thousands of reviews) have been rated just as positively, if not more so, than the higher-end brushes, so at least some users consider those brushes a reasonable choice.
Like we discussed above, plaque (especially mature plaque) definitely can provide a fortress for the ‘bad bugs’ to increase their populations (bad news).  A recent article titled, Understanding the root cause of tooth decay and gum disease, explains how the microbes in an environment are the heavy hitters that ‘control the playing field’.  When plaque matures, the types of microbes shift from a healthy balance of microbes to an environment dominated and controlled by ‘bad bugs’.
Whether you use a manual toothbrush or an electric toothbrush, you ought to be changing the toothbrush or toothbrush head every 3 months. To understand why, read the article, “How often should I change my toothbrush?” Whether or not you use these sanitizing techniques, you ought to be rinsing your toothbrush with clean water every day to rinse germs out of your tooth brush.
Hygienists are in demand in general dental practices and in specialty practices such as periodontics or pediatric dentistry. They also may be employed to provide dental hygiene services for patients in hospitals, nursing homes and public health clinics.
Do not soak your toothbrush in mouthwash or a disinfecting solution. According to the American Dental Association, there is no clinical evidence that soaking your toothbrush in antibacterial mouthwash has any effect on your oral health.[13]
I find this very interesting. I have never had an electric toothbrush last more than a couple of years before the battery dies out (slowly at first, then completely). I am actually on this discussion board because the battery on the Oral B, bought approx. 2-3 years ago, now needs an every-other-day charge.
Although studies have shown that various microorganisms can grow on toothbrushes after use, and other studies have examined various methods to reduce the level of these bacteria,6-10 there is insufficient clinical evidence to support that bacterial growth on toothbrushes will lead to specific adverse oral or systemic health effects.
Yes I do, and I laid them out already: it’s a biased set of studies, performed by a biased panel, deliberately constrained to a extremely confined audience of one “special issue” of one publication. The methods and procedures are laid out by the revelation of the authors, their backers, and the publication. It makes the entire analysis suspect. You are taking their data at their word.
The Dazzlepro Advanced Sonic’s handle is a little large and unwieldy, a satiny plastic tapered toward the middle of the handle, and the charging base is hefty, but this brush does a reasonable approximation of the Sonicare brushes’ motion. The Dazzlepro brush has a separate “sensitive” cleaning mode. However, the company has a lower profile, and the warranty lasts only one year (compared with Sonicare and Oral-B’s two years), so if you need support you may be left wanting. This brush is currently unavailable on Amazon and Overstock.
Hello everyone, i am a junior in highschool and i have been interested in becoming a dental hygienist for a while now, i’ve been debating being a flight attendant or a dental hygenist. but reading these negative comments are making me wonder if i should re-evaluate my decision! i have always enjoyed going to the dentist as a child. flying in airplanes for a career and not coming home at the end of every day just doesn’t fit me! i’m more interested in an easy going job that won’t put me completely on my a** at the end of the day with enough cash to support myself. as a little girl i’ve dreamed of having a career such as this, and i don’t like hearing it can be a huge mistake! if somebody could tell me what schooling i must go through, and if being a dental hygenist is a good choice for a girl like me.

Therefore if you own the Sonicare, 2 Series plaque defence, 3 Series gum health, DiamondClean, EasyClean, FlexCare, FlexCare Platinum, FlexCare+, for Kids or HealthyWhite any of the following brush heads can be used.
Now, don’t get me wrong, I love these things when they work. But they are exceptionally unreliable. Reading the comments and reviews on Amazon, it appears I’m not alone. However, it also appears their competitors suffer from the same issues of reliability. So I think as long as you are prepared for a very short life and are willing to shell out the cash, they are worth purchasing. Just be aware.
Streptococci, staphylococci and treponema denticola – these are just a few names of the different bacteria that exist in the average mouth every day.  It is estimated that most people’s mouths have literally millions of these organisms thriving just on the surfaces of the teeth. Having an abundance of bacteria is a contributor to tooth decay and gum disease, so keeping an environment less friendly to the harmful bacteria is one way to promote oral health.
I thought maybe it was just a design difference and not a performance difference, as the gum health is not very good looking compared to the Flexcare+ and that the 31000 vibrations were what counted, but the gum care model was a big disappointment. Unpleasant noise and lower amplitude at the strokes compared to the Flexcare+ and also the handle vibrated, so more an experience like the Oral B, though I think it is still cleaning better than the Oral B.
All Sonicare toothbrushes come with a brush head to help you benefit from the incredible cleaning power of the brand’s sonic technology. Like manual toothbrushes, the power toothbrush heads become worn due to the friction of brushing and can begin to harbor bacteria over time. As a result, Sonicare recommends that the brush heads for all of their models be replaced every 3 months. This helps to keep Sonicare toothbrushes sanitary and functioning at their best. In addition to the standard brush heads sold with Sonicare products, the brand also offers specialty heads that can be used in a variety of their sonic toothbrush models. These heads can help you to address oral care concerns that you may have, such as reducing staining from drinking coffee and tea or removing more plaque from along the gum line. By choosing the right head for your Sonic toothbrush, you can optimize the cleaning power of the sonic movements to better meet the needs of your teeth and gums.
If you are lucky, your Philips Sonicare will fail while still under guarantee, and they will replace it. Our experience was it failed just after the guarantee expired. Knowing we liked it, someone bought us another one. Guess, what, it too failed (just within guarantee).
Although experts don’t know for sure what starts atherosclerosis, the process seems to stem from damage to the lining of the arterial wall. This damage, which enables the deposition of plaque, may result from:
If your Sonicare has the Quadpacer feature, you can make sure you brush evenly throughout the mouth by dividing your mouth into 4 sections and using the Quadpacer feature to brush each section for an equal amount of time
A sonic toothbrush produces rapid movements of the brush head that cause vibrations in the hearing (audible) range. The models that fall within this category function at frequencies that range from 200 to 400 Hz, hence within the human hearing range of 20 to 20,000 Hz. This high in amplitude movement equates anywhere from 24,000 to 48,000 brush strokes per minute. In more general terms, this is the commercially accepted standard for measuring the speed of sonic toothbrushes.
The Interdental Tip brush heads are unlike any offered by Sonicare. They are ultra-small and their pointed nature makes them useful for brushing between teeth or hard to reach locations. (The Oral-B Pulsonic offers this type of brush head too.)
!! This is an important point because despite what type your brush came with originally, you can switch to any other (style or size) head. That makes for a lot of options. (More information about brush heads.)
You also only get two options in terms of replacing brush heads: the Standard and Compact size from the e-Series. This is due to the older brush attachment technology that this sonic toothbrush model uses. Namely, you need to screw-on and off the brush head, rather than snap it on and off.
There is no dark magic and wizardly spells surrounding these vibrating and rotating toothbrushes. They are rather simple devices powered by a small motor that makes motions at sonic speed. The purpose of these electric gadgets is to help clean teeth by using rapid and automatic bristle motions.
You use a vibrating sonic toothbrush, like the Philips Sonicare, the same way you do a manual toothbrush – by brushing in circular motions to reach all your teeth. There is some evidence that suggests vibrating brushes can clean areas where others can’t. The vibrations help dislodge plaque and send water and toothpaste into areas that other electric brushes may not reach. Users of sonic brushes often report that their mouth feels cleaner, which is a benefit itself.
The bacteria that cause gum diseases are anaerobic. That means they live in a low oxygen environment and these bacteria are killed by exposure to air. The simple act of letting your toothbrush dry between brushing will kill many bacteria. Do not store your toothbrush in a covered container where it does not receive adequate ventilation. Also the bristles usually come in contact with the walls of a closed container and that will contaminate the toothbrush unless the toothbrush container was just cleaned.
The Sonicare 2 includes the two-minute timer and rechargeable battery. When we first tested this model, it did not have the 30-second pacing timer, but we recently confirmed with Philips that current Series 2 handles now come with a quadrant timer. We don’t think the pacing timer is absolutely necessary, but it’s nice that the line now has this feature.
An ASA physical status classification system is used to indicate future treatment options for the patient, whilst considering the implications of risk factors, such as medical conditions (i.e. endocarditis, diabetes, smoking). This also allows the dental clinician to begin planning all non-surgical therapy.
At about 4.5 ounces, the Philips Sonicare 2 is easy to use and comfortable to hold. It arrived with a bit of a charge, but the manufacturer still recommends an overnight charge before use. Fully charged, it will run for two weeks. As with most of its rivals, its warranty lasts two years. While there are many brush heads in the Philips range, only one comes with the Sonicare 2. Blue “reminder bristles” change to white as they wear down. This color change serves as a reminder to replace the head, and we think it’s an excellent feature.
Is there a relationship between “sensitive” mode on some brushes and low or medium “intensity” on Series 3. Fewer strokes/min? Also, please confirm that only “clean” mode, i.e. full bore 31,000 strokes /min, accomplishes the “fluid dynamic” cleaning – or does sensitive &/or med/low intensity just have less?? My concern centers around abrasive notching of the root surface. Does any particular brush head facilitate fluid dynamic cleaning? Intercare? Thanks
Flexcare Platinum has some of the features of DiamondClean but comes at a lower price. It’s not as advanced as the previous model and also lacks some of its useful features. However, it’s still a powerful toothbrush with immense cleaning capabilities.
“We may find that we need to carefully balance the supplementation with vitamin D3 and omega-3 fatty acids, depending on each patient in order to help promote efficient clearing of amyloid-beta,” says Fiala.
Brushing modes: a) Full-power mode is stated to be 25% faster than a Sonicare, which should place it in the 38,750 brush strokes per minute range. We don’t see this as a giant advantage over a Sonicare (31,000 brush strokes/min.)   b) This brush also has a reduced-power “sensitive” mode.

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