Lowest Price For philips sonicare healthywhite electric rechargeable toothbrush hx8911 |

Interdental brushes come in a range of color-coded sizes. They consist of a handle with a piece of wire covered in tapered bristles, designed to be placed into the interdental space for plaque removal.[1] Studies indicate that interdental brushes are equally or more effective then floss when removing plaque and reducing gum inflammation.[1]
There are some bonus features that you can look for when choosing your brushing companion. For example, look for the American Dentist Association (ADA) seal of approval. This is always a good sign that you are buying a trusted and tested product.
The right toothbrush for you depends on your personal preference—do you want a classic brush that costs a couple bucks at the drugstore? Or do you want to shell out for an electric toothbrush that does some of the work for you? According the American Dental Association, they both work equally well to clean your teeth. But a powered toothbrush might help you ditch some of your bad brushing habits—like not going for long enough and failing to hit hard-to-reach spots—and a 2014 Cochrane review of gave powered models a slight edge over the classic toothbrush. 
Not at all, Jose! If becoming a dental hygienist is something you’re interested in, you should absolutely pursue it. You can learn more about our Dental Hygiene program by visiting http://carrington.edu/degrees/dental-hygiene/. Also, we have a blog article exactly about this, highlighting one of our male colleagues, a Dental Hygienist! Here’s the blog article: http://carrington.edu/blog/medical/real-men-wear-pink/. If you have any other questions or would like to set up an appointment to discuss enrollment, give us a call at 1-855-289-2171.
If you plan on buying a pair for you and your partner, I strongly suggest buying from Costco for their lifetime return policy. They have comparable Oral-B and SonicCare models and regularly run sales.
Vibrating – this technique creates a rapid buzz against the teeth. Interestingly enough, some Philips toothbrushes offer this feature in addition to their oscillating attribute. The two movements can be triggered to perform simultaneously and destroy plaque that even Chuck Norris could not get to.
You could also mash together a super nourishing paste of vitamin C heavy fruits. So, oranges, tomatoes, strawberries, and anything else that you have in the house. Mix together until you get a thick paste and then apply this to the tartar and plaque build ups. Leave to rest for five minutes and then rinse thoroughly. The vitamin C will help to remove bacteria and keep your mouth healthy.
This works 2 ways – firstly by covering your brush head to keep germs away from it, and second by using various essential oils known for killing bugs (e.g. tea tree, clove, peppermint). These are designed to be disposable however, so you are supposed to replace them every 3 months. It’s not my personal choice, but a lot of people swear by these. They cost around $4 each RRP but you can get multi-packs, which can bring the price down a lot.
I have owned my toothbrush for four years. In fact, I bought this product in 2012 for $31 and am only reviewing it now! It looks like the price went down a bit since I bought it. Since then, I have obviously bought many other replacements since $31 is expensive in comparison.

Everyone develops plaque because bacteria are constantly growing in our mouths, which is not necessarily easy to see. Plaque that is not removed from around the gum line can cause inflammation and irritation to the gums around your teeth, leading to gingivitis (red, swollen, bleeding gums). If gingivitis is not treated, it can progress to periodontal disease and, possibly, tooth loss.
Soaking your toothbrush in antibacterial mouthwash for ten minutes after your illness ends may kill germs that might cause a return of the illness; however, it is a better idea to simply replace the toothbrush.[18]
I’ve been reviewing all of the various Philips Sonicare models to determine which features I think have value and are worth paying for and I agree with your assessment regarding the 3 series, however I have visited a retailer who has all of them on display. The one thing that jumped out at me was how noisy the 3 series is compared to the other higher end models. No mention of this was made in your assessment of the different models. Are you aware of this and if so, why would this model have a different motor that produces so much more noise. It’s a significant difference and seemed annoying.
The tasks hygienists may perform, and the extent to which they must be supervised by a dentist, vary by state and by the setting in which the dental hygienist works. For example, some states allow hygienists to diagnose certain health problems independently of a dentist.
!! This is an important point because despite what type your brush came with originally, you can switch to any other (style or size) head. That makes for a lot of options. (More information about brush heads.)
There’s no need to replace the heads when they get dirty. Just soak them in cup with 25% bleach and 75% water for 15 minutes and they’ll be good as new. I’ve been doing this for years and they haven’t worn out yet.
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I find this very interesting. I have never had an electric toothbrush last more than a couple of years before the battery dies out (slowly at first, then completely). I am actually on this discussion board because the battery on the Oral B, bought approx. 2-3 years ago, now needs an every-other-day charge.
That said, I was working full time and making a solid salary, but I went into hygiene with the same idea you have. I am in school again and working two days a week. I actually got a raise switching to part time (2days/week) (lost my benefits though – something to consider), but am making almost the same salary as I was working full time.
I used my first Sonicare for two years but the rubberized base became moldy and smelly and I needed to replace it. The second I used for 4 years and it became useless when the brush head would not stay on the base during use.
A point of order about the word “sonic”: Per advertising from Sonicare that is now close to two decades old, some people take this to mean that sonic toothbrushes “knock off plaque” with “sound waves.” This is not an effect proven in any research.
As for the strange silicone bristles of the Foreo, Dr. Glassman revealed that “silicone is non-abrasive, which makes it impossible to put too much pressure on your teeth, thus preventing gum recession and sensitivity.” Our experts also explained that unlike standard nylon bristles, silicone is nonporous which leaves less room on the bristles for bacteria to grow. While this makes the Foreo sound perfect, Dr. Glassman warned us that “there is not a lot of literature or clinical studies on their effectiveness with removing bacteria” from teeth. Dr. Lawlor agreed and explained “the bristle size is too thick for the silicone at this point, it’ll be too bulky to slip under your gums. There’s hope for the future, but it’s important to not give up important designs.” For now, the regular bristles of our top picks are the most effective way to go.
It’s easy enough to say that using a brush that has a more refined design (less noise, less handle vibration) makes for a more pleasant brushing experience. But how important those characteristics are for you to accomplish the act of brushing your teeth would simply be up to you.
Storing your toothbrush upright (bristles up, handle down) after use is very important. This allows the water to drain from the bristles easier and all the water and particles collect at the bottom of the handle of the toothbrush. Also you may notice that a nasty scum collects at the bottom of containers that do not have a drain at the bottom, and you do not want your bristles touching that scum that could cause your bristles to collect mold and bacteria.
This is the first and only toothbrush with individual Pro-Flex sides. These Pro-Flex sides adjust to the unique contours of your teeth and gums to remove more plaque than a regular manual toothbrush*. The brush’s flexibility helps Clinical Pro-Flex deliver an outstanding, gentle clean.
This article is remiss in not dealing with the huge issue of replacing batteries. The built-in obsolescence in all these brushes is both an environmental evil and an economic abuse. Imagine if a few torch manufacturers managed to corner the market, form an oligopoly and start making torches which you had to throw away once the battery died. That’s what we have here with this lot.
If a subscription service will help you replace your brush heads regularly, Goby has all the features we look for in a brush: a 30-second quadrant timer that stops after two minutes and a rechargeable battery. The Goby has only one type of brush head available (rotating), so if you like to customize your brush this service may not be for you.
I am not a gadget kind of person. I like things to be practical and valuable so I don’t like bells and whistles necessary, especially when they will cost more and I won’t get a lot of use from them. So thank you for making it so straightforward to understand the options that are truly valuable. I’ve ordered my sonicare and am really looking forward to receiving it. Thanks so much for your help!!
Jump up ^ Johnson, D.L.; Karkut, R.T. (October 1994). “Performance by gender in a stop-smoking program combining hypnosis and aversion”. Psychological reports. 75 (2): 851–7. doi:10.2466/pr0.1994.75.2.851. PMID 7862796.
The Mesa Community College program is accredited by The Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association. The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education.
A dental hygienist or oral hygienist is a licensed dental professional, registered with a dental association, or regulatory body within their country of practice. Prior to completing clinical and written board examinations, Registered Dental Hygienists must have either an Associates or Bachelors degree in Dental Hygiene from an accredited college or university. Once registered, hygienists are primary healthcare professionals who work independently of or alongside Dentists and other dental professionals to provide full oral health care. They have the training and education that focus on and specialize in the prevention and treatment of many oral disease. The dental hygienist is a primary resource for oral cancer screening and prevention. Most importantly, they spend a large amount of time at each patient visit looking at the soft tissues of the oral cavity, where the early manifestations of oral cancer occur.[1] They can choose to work in a range of dental settings from independent practice, private practice, and specialist practice to the public sector, and they can also work in residential aged care facilities.[2][3] Dental hygienists have a specific scope of clinical procedures they provide to their patients. They assess a patient’s condition in order to offer patient-specific preventative and educational services to promote and maintain good oral health. The use of therapeutic methods assists their patients in controlling oral disease, while providing tailored treatment plans that emphasize the importance of behavioral changes .[4] In most jurisdictions, hygienists work for a dentist or dental specialist, and some are licensed to administer local anesthesia and perform dental radiography.[5] The major role of a dental hygienist is to perform periodontal therapy which includes things such periodontal charting, periodontal debridement (scaling and root planing), prophylaxis (preventing disease) or periodontal maintenance procedures for patients with periodontal disease. In addition to these procedures, hygienists may take intraoral radiographs, apply dental sealants, administer topical fluoride, administer local anesthesia, and provide patient specific oral hygiene instruction.[6] They are also able to work at an orthodontic clinic and can perform many tasks there such as selecting and sizing of orthodontic bands for dental braces, the removal of orthodontic appliances. They are also able to make dental impressions for the construction of study casts and mouthguards.[4]
The pressure sensor is meant to alert the user when they are brushing too hard, something that dentists and experts agree is a bad thing. In theory, then, a pressure sensor can be good. However, in our testing, we found that some brushes with pressure sensors required the user to bear down very hard on their teeth before the alert would trigger. The amount of pressure a user can apply before the sensor discourages them suggests the available pressure sensors are more of a gimmick than an actual useful feature.
According to the American Dental Hygienists Association, there are more than 330 dental hygiene programs offered in the U.S. Most hygienists have at least an associate degree, but some get bachelor’s degrees in dental hygiene – and even master’s degrees to further their careers. To practice, dental hygienists also have to obtain a state-specific license. Although the requirements vary state to state, most require graduation from an accredited program and the completion of a written and practical exam.

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